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5 Tips for Finding a Graphic Designer

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Updated April 3, 2017
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How to Find a Graphic Designer

5 Tips for Finding a Graphic Designer


Tim Brown

Tim Brown is the owner of Hook Agency, and strategic marketer focused primarily on driving traffic and leads for small businesses and construction companies.

How to Find a Graphic Designer

Branding is not something to be taken lightly. There is no denying in its importance. You have to blend powerful designs, engaging marketing collaterals, and an easy to understand brand message together to fabricate your brand’s success. This is where a professional graphic designer comes in. They are responsible for how your brand is going to look in the coming future.

Your 1st impression will definitely be the last for your customers if your marketing collaterals are not appealing. Click To Tweet

You can take my word for it! Hiring an experienced and prolific graphic designer in your team is a must, no matter how intimidating the recruiting process may feel. Agree! Designers’ vocabulary can be extraneous to yours, and their practices may sound unusual either. Yet, with a little research work, you can end up hiring a candidate fairly well at the job!

Focus on selecting someone who is quite easy to work with, capable of finding creative solutions to all design problems, and can show unwavering determination towards your project’s success. Discusses here are the five helpful tips for finding the right candidate for the graphic designing job.

TIP #1: CHECK THE PORTFOLIO BUT DON’T RELY ON IT

Designer’s portfolio encompasses visuals as well as the story they are built on—both are extremely important. (Click to tweet)

No matter how cliché it sounds, but reviewing portfolio is still considered as the best way to assess one’s skills. Following are some tricks to follow while peeking at the portfolios.

  1. Try not to be too specific; consider both the relative and absolute elements. The relative ones will help you gauge how well the designer’s style conforms to your brand, whereas the absolute ones will scale the skills, experience, and expertise.
  2. Look for something inexplicable that resonates with your brand voice.
  3. Don’t get impressed with a profound industry experience especially when you want your designer to add a fresh visual spin on your company’s brand.

It is recommended to make sure that your prospective designer has actually crafted the designs exhibited in the portfolio. Question them about the designs and the inspiration behind these particular projects. That way you can ensure the authenticity of the portfolio and get a better insight into how your designer works, plus how their inspiration can fit your brand (if you hire him/her).

TIP #2: Talk to the designer.

It can be tough to get a sense of your prospective designers when you can’t read their body language or see their expressions yourself. Instead of communicating on phone, it is good to interview the candidates in person or over a video chat. This gives you a clear idea whether the two of you can really gel together or not. If you both have a similar style of attitude, communication, energy level and project dedication, then this relationship will most probably be very smooth.

Also, analyze if you two can understand each other or have similar definitions for concepts. If you get confused at any point, ask questions! You can also ask the candidates to share sketches and stories of their previous projects creatively. Taking interviews in person can also help the candidate get familiar with the office environment and as companies compete for talent, personal assessments may persuade a candidate to accept your offer.

TIP #3: Check their references

When hiring designers, people often go wrong as they get stunned by ostensibly brilliant design capabilities, and consequently, are blinded to other important considerations. Long story short, if you really like some specific projects in the candidate’s portfolio, ask for the client’s contact information. It is fairly possible that your designer is bound to keep the information private and that the client does not want to get bothered by such inquiries, so be open to reasons.

When you get the contact information, you should contact a person who has hands-on experience of working with the designer directly. This gives you the strategic perspective about the candidate you are going to hire.

 sketch-vs-photoshop

Tip #4: Check their skills.

Besides having eyes for the beauty and hands for the software, there are many skills a designer need to have.

Quite essential it is to have a basic idea of the design world as well as of the skills your project requires. Such as, will your project use stock photos or animated ones? Will most of the custom logo design mockups be created in Sketch or Adobe Photoshop? Searching for these realizations—when recruiting a designer—will help you filter the candidate’s list. Just try to make sure to get what you actually need.

Make sure that the shortlisted designers do not limit the expertise to online one design program. For designers, being a master of Adobe Illustrator is not enough – s/he should also have an understanding of Adobe Photoshop, FreeHand, CorelDraw and other important software.

 

Tip # 5: See how applicants think on their feet

One more method to confine the candidates is to ask something surprising in the interview process. Such as, you could ask them to critique a competitor’s work and justify their commonest while suggesting a rectification. The answer itself will give you the acumen to judge the candidate’s capabilities, and the way they provide the answer will help you understand their creative process in a more clear way. The objective here is to consider how well each contender can deal with the unknown and thinks in a rush.

To wrap up

Following these tactics, you should be capable of filtering the list of shortlisted finalists. The results you will draw from these tactics cannot be availed by examining the resumes only. Yet again! When you approach your preferred designers for an interview, you may have a look at their resumes in order to gauge their experience level and past work.

Try to get more hands-on interaction with your candidates during the interview process. This will ensure hiring of a deserving resource and a healthy working relationship. Years of work, alone, cannot draw any conclusion; it is just one indicator, and it always assists you in having some context before you take the plunge.

 

image007Author Bio:
David Carry is a passionate designer himself. He is an expert in providing highly reassuring logo design services alongside of other design solutions. In his leisure time, he love to write blogs and articles by focusin

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Tim Brown

Tim Brown is the owner of Hook Agency, and strategic marketer focused primarily on driving traffic and leads for small businesses and construction companies.

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